An open-minded, big-hearted, intimate exploration of modern marriage. An Un-Romantic Comedy about the price of free love.

YOURS UNFAITHFULLY is an insightful, intelligent and exceptionally intimate peek behind the closed doors of an open marriage. Stephen and Anne, blissfully happy for eight years, are committed to living up to their ideals. When Stephen, a writer who isn’t writing, begins to sink into a funk of unproductive moodiness, Anne encourages him to seek out a fresh spark. Can their marriage survive uncompromising generosity, sacrifice and love?

Few qualities are so rare among contemporary dramatists as the power, which Mr. Malleson possesses, to create love that looks to no audience but its own. His lovers preserve, even on the stage, so much of the deep privacy of love, so much of its power in instants of magic to exclude the world as if the world was not, that we who watch are made intruders.   – The Times, reviewing Merrileon Wise by Miles Malleson 1926

YOURS UNFAITHFULLY was published in 1933 but never produced, making Mint’s production a very belated World Premiere.

A handful of newspapers reviewed YOURS UNFAITHFULLY in its printed form in 1933. The Spectator described it as “vivacious and intelligent, as you would expect from Mr. Malleson.” Bertrand Russell (Nobel Prize in Literature, 1950) critiqued the play for the Observer, calling it “the best play that Mr. Malleson has hitherto produced, both because it is well constructed and moves with great sureness, and also because it is quite free from all taint of propaganda…The subject is treated delightfully, with humor and kindliness and without any dogmatic conclusion. The characters behave as real people do behave, and not according to some convention of the theatre.”

Russell neglects to mention that the play seems to find inspiration in his own marriage.

 

For tickets visit HERE, or call Telecharge at 212-239-6200.

William Miles Malleson (1888-1969)

In December of 1968, a few months before he passed away, Malleson started work on an autobiography. He described having two childhoods, one was almost absurdly idyllic: “I cannot believe there was a happier family in England, or anywhere else in the world, for that matter.” The other was spent on school holidays with his grandparents and uncle, a local vicar. All three adults were “passionately Puritanical.” Malleson recalls several interrogations about “impure thoughts” on these visits which left him “absolutely terrified with guilt and fear for my life. And that guilt has followed me through my life,” he wrote at the age of 80, “It took me years and years to throw off—even if I’ve done so now.”

Malleson’s plays, always personal and passionate, reflect the clash of these two conflicting and formative experiences. He was a playwright of rare insight and conviction and his plays were charged with a provocative wit and passion for social reform—including causes of sexual freedom, and equity between the sexes.

A comic presence in British films, as well as the stage, Malleson’s acting work increasingly eclipsed his playwriting. Today he might be remembered for playing the Sultan in The Thief of Bagdad (which he also wrote), the hangman in Kind Hearts and Coronets (1949, with Sir Alec Guinness) or Rev. Chasuble in The Importance of Being Earnest (1952, with Edith Evans). At the time of his death in 1969, his plays had long been underestimated:

“The Malleson behind the comedian’s face, the Malleson who cared sincerely for the advancement of the liberties of man, never wholly discovered himself save to those who knew him personally.” (Times, March 17, 1969)

by Ronald Franks, chlorobromide print on card mount, 1964

William Miles Malleson, 1964

Cast

Todd Cerveris
Elisabeth Gray
John Hutton
Mikaela Izquierdo
Max von Essen

Creatives

  • Directing Jonathan Bank
  • Sets Carolyn Mraz
  • Costumes Hunter Kaczorowski
  • Lights Xavier Pierce
  • Original Music & Sound Jane Shaw
  • Projections Katherine Freer
  • Props Joshua Yocom
  • Casting Stephanie Klapper, CSA
  • Production Stage Manager Pamela Edington
  • Stage Manager Jeff Meyers
  • Illustration Stefano Imbert
  • Graphics Hey Jude Design, Inc.
  • Advertising The Pekoe Group
  • Press David Gersten & Associates

“LIBERTY AND LOVE? THE MARRIAGE OF DORA AND BERTRAND RUSSELL”
DEBORAH GORHAM, CARLETON UNIVERSITY

Wednesday, December 28 after the matinee

Deborah Gorham serves as Distinguished Research Professor in the Department of History at Carleton University. She is the author of Marion Dewar: A Life of Action and Vera Brittain: A Feminist Life. She has published articles on the marriage of Dora and Bertrand Russell (which provided Malleson with inspiration for his play), and on the progressive Beacon Hill School, which the couple founded in 1927.

“TO STRAY OR NOT TO STRAY: THE SCIENCE BEHIND OPEN RELATIONSHIPS”
DR. HELEN FISHER, AUTHOR OF ANATOMY OF LOVE: A NATURAL HISTORY OF MATING, MARRIAGE AND WHY WE STRAY

Saturday, January 7 after the matinee

Helen Fisher, PhD Biological Anthropologist, is a Senior Research Fellow at The Kinsey Institute, member of the Center for Human Evolutionary Studies in the Department of Anthropology at Rutgers University, and Chief Scientific Advisor to the Internet dating site Match.com. She has conducted extensive research and written six books on the evolution and future of human sex, love, and marriage.

“A MAN OF IDEAS: MILES MALLESON’S MODERN COMEDIES"
MAYA CANTU, THEATER HISTORIAN AND DRAMATURG

Sunday, January 8 after the matinee

Maya Cantu is a theater historian, scholar, and Dramaturgical Advisor for the Mint. Maya currently serves on the Drama Faculty of Bennington College is the author of the book, American Cinderellas on the Broadway Musical Stage: Imagining the Working Girl from Irene to Gypsy. Her discussion will focus on the life and work of Miles Malleson.

“IT’S VERY DIFFICULT TO KEEP ON SAYING NO, ISN’T IT?”: SEX AND BRITISH MODERNISM
ANNE FERNALD, FORDHAM UNIVERSITY

Saturday, January 14 after the matinee

Anne Fernald is Professor of English and Women’s Studies at Fordham University. She is the author of Virginia Woolf: Feminism and the Reader and the editor of a textual edition of Mrs. Dalloway for Cambridge University Press. Anne will discuss the work of Miles Malleson in the context of British Modernist literature, which rejected Victorian attitudes toward sex and marriage.

“HOW LONG HAS THIS BEEN GOING ON?
EXPERIMENTAL MARRIAGE IN THE 20TH CENTURY”
KRISTIN CELELLO, CUNY QUEENS COLLEGE

Sunday, January 15 after the matinee

Professor Celello is Associate Professor of History at CUNY Queens College. She is the author of Making Marriage Work: A History of Marriage and Divorce in the Twentieth-Century United States and the co-editor of Domestic Tensions, National Anxieties: Global Perspectives on Marriage, Crisis, and Nation. She is currently writing a book titled After Divorce: Parents, Children, and the Making of the Modern American Family.

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