UPCOMING:

 

 

 

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DAYS TO COME

January 4, 2021 – February 21, 2021

“IT’S A GRIPPING, LUCID EXAMINATION OF THE DANGEROUS INTERSECTION OF ECONOMIC, SOCIAL, AND PERSONAL FORCES.”

The New Yorker

Lillian Hellman’s second play, Days to Come, is a family drama set against the backdrop of labor strife in a small Ohio town which threatens to tear apart both town and family. “It’s the story of innocent people on both sides who are drawn into conflict and events far beyond their comprehension,” Hellman said in an interview before Days to Come opened in 1936. “It’s the saga of a man who started something he cannot stop…”

To read the program, or learn more about the play and production, visit our Production Archives.

 

KATIE ROCHE

Streaming February 1, 2021 – March 28, 2021

“A GLOWING, EVOCATIVE PRODUCTION… DEEVY’S DIALOGUE IS PRACTICALLY MINIMALIST, BUT IN VERY FEW WORDS AN ENTIRE CULTURE IS REVEALED, AND THE MYSTERIES OF THE HUMAN HEART EXPLORED.”

The New Yorker

Mint Theater continued its exhaustive exploration into the work of Teresa Deevy — which began with Wife to James Whelan in 2010, and Temporal Powers in 2011 — with a production of Deevy’s most celebrated drama, Katie Roche. The play’s mercurial heroine is a servant girl whose romantic ambitions reach for the heavens. “Katie Roche is the third Deevy work to be produced by the Mint in as many years. It may be the best one yet,” wrote David Barbour in Lighting and Sound America.

To read the program, or learn more about the play and production, visit our Production Archives.

To see Video of our EnrichMint Speakers, visit our EnrichMint Video Archives.

 

WOMEN WITHOUT MEN

February 22 – April 18

“IMPRESSIVE… VERY SUCCESSFUL… THE MINT’S UNIFORMLY FINE PLAYERS, DIRECTED BY JENN THOMPSON, GET TO SINK THEIR TEETH INTO A RANGE OF JUICY CHARACTER ROLES..”

The New Yorker

Women Without Men is a workplace drama laced with biting humor, set in the teacher’s lounge of a private girls’ boarding school in Ireland in the 1930s. The play explores the clash of conflicting natures and petty competitions that erupt amongst the school’s cloistered teaching staff. Playwright Hazel Ellis began her theatrical career in the 1930s as a member of the acting ensemble of the Gate Theatre in Dublin. She went on to write two plays for the company, including Women Without Men which was produced at the Gate in 1938. Despite acclaim, the play was never published or revived — until we produced the play’s belated American premiere to much acclaim in 2016 at New York City Center Stage II.

Shannon Harrington, Joyce Cohen, Beatrice Tulchin, and Alexa Shae Niziak in WOMEN WITHOUT MEN by Hazel Ellis, directed by Jenn Thompson. Photo by Richard Termine.

To read the program, or learn more about the play and production, visit our Production Archives.

To see Video of our EnrichMint Speakers, visit our EnrichMint Video Archives.

YOURS UNFAITHFULLY

March 22 – May 16

“THE SPLENDID CAST OF FIVE INHABITS THE CHARACTERS WITH PASSION AND GRACE. IN BRINGING NEGLECTED WORKS TO LIGHT, THE MINT PERFORMS A GREAT TRICK: MODERN AUDIENCES EXPERIENCE WHAT IT MUST HAVE BEEN LIKE TO SEE A PLAY IN ANOTHER ERA, WHEN CAREFUL LISTENING WAS EXPECTED — AND REWARDED.”

The New Yorker

An “un-romantic comedy” about the price of free love, YOURS UNFAITHFULLY is an insightful, intelligent and exceptionally intimate peek behind the closed doors of an open marriage. Stephen and Anne, blissfully happy for eight years, are committed to living up to their ideals. When Stephen, a writer who isn’t writing, begins to sink into a funk of unproductive moodiness, Anne encourages him to seek out a fresh spark. Can their marriage survive uncompromising generosity, sacrifice and love? More than the story of an unconventional couple, the play is about what happens when our ideals clash with our emotions.

Max von Essen, Mikaela Izquierdo, and Elisabeth Gray in YOURS UNFAITHFULLY by Miles Malleson, directed by Jonathan Bank. Photo by Richard Termine.

To read the program, click here.  To learn more about the play and production, visit our Production Archives.

To see Video of our EnrichMint Speakers, visit our EnrichMint Video Archives.

A PICTURE OF AUTUMN

April 19- June 13

“N.C. HUNTER’S BEAUTIFUL, SHAMEFULLY NEGLECTED COMEDY WAS PERFORMED ONLY ONCE IN LONDON IN 1951, AND RECEIVES ITS AMERICAN PREMIERE HERE… IT’S ABOUT AN AGING, ONCE PROSPEROUS FAMILY LIVING IN AN AGAING, ONCE GRAND MANOR, AND THE ECHOES OF CHEKHOV ARE UNMISTAKABLE, IF SUBDUED AND ANGLICIZED. IT’S A BIG, GENEROUS PLAY, EXQUISITELY WRITTEN, BOTH FUNNY AND TOUCHING.”

The New Yorker

A Picture of Autumn made its debut on February 11, 1951 in a one-night ‘try-out’ performance presented by the Repertory Players, at the Duke of York’s Theatre on London’s West End. Despite promising reviews, the play was never picked up. Instead, Hunter enjoyed great success with his plays Waters of the MoonA Day by the Sea and A Touch of the Sun, which dominated the West End throughout the fifties. Meanwhile, A PICTURE OF AUTUMN gathered dust until our acclaimed production—the play’s first in over 60 years.

Helen Cespedes and George Morfogen in A PICTURE OF AUTUMN by N.C. Hunter, directed by Gus Kaikkonen. Photo by Richard Termine.

To read the program, or learn more about the play and production, visit our Production Archives.

To see Video of our EnrichMint Speakers, visit our EnrichMint Video Archives.

THE FATAL WEAKNESS

May 17 – June 27

“THIS PRODUCTION, LUCIDLY DIRECTED BY JESSE MARCHESE, IS EXEMPLARY OF THE MINT’S HOUSE STYLE. THE CAST COULDN’T BE BETTER, WITH CYNTHIA DARLOW CLINCHING TOP HONORS AS A COMPULSIVE GOSSIP. THE STAGE, AS ALWAYS, IS TINY, BUT THAT MERELY ADDS TO THE INTIMACY OF THE PROCEEDINGS, AND VICKI R. DAVIS’S SITTING-ROOM SET IS FINELY AND CONVINCINGLY DETAILED.”

The Wall Street Journal

The Fatal Weakness, George Kelly’s last produced play, tells the story of Ollie Espenshade—an incurable romantic who discovers, after 28 years of marriage, that her husband is a lying cheat.  It opened in New York on November 19, 1946 in a production starring Ina Claire.  Although Claire’s triumphant return to Broadway after a five year absence garnered much of the press attention, Kelly’s play turned more than a few critics’ heads. Our production was the play’s first New York revival in 68 years.

Kristin Griffith, Victoria Mack, and Cliff Bemis in THE FATAL WEAKNESS by George Kelly, directed by Jesse Marchese. Photo by Richard Termine.

To read the program, or learn more about the play and production, visit our Production Archives.

To see Video of our EnrichMint Speakers, visit our EnrichMint Video Archives.

Are your videos closed-captioned?
Yes! For Closed Captioning, click the CC button in the toolbar at the bottom of the video viewer and select “English CC”.
Can I watch your videos on my television?
Maybe. If you have a Smart TV with a web browser, you can go to our website, the same as you would on your computer or tablet. Or you may be able to “cast” from your device to your television. Here’s a web page from “wikiHow” with a variety of articles that may help.
Can I watch any play whenever I want?
No, you can only watch during the dates listed, when they are available on demand 24 hours a day. That’s when the actors are under contract and being paid. Directors and designers too.
If you are paying salaries, why aren’t you charging admission?
We want to share our work with as many people as we can. Besides, this is a new way to watch a play and we want you to be able to try it for free and see if you like it. Of course you are welcome to contribute, and happily, many people do.