(Click image below to play video)
Mint Year End 2014

"SMOOTHLY IMPECCABLE..."

In his review of The Fatal Weakness, Terry Teachout of the Wall Street Journal referred to the Mint's "near-perfect track record of exhuming forgotten plays of the previous century that deserve a happier fate...As usual at the Mint, the acting and staging are smoothly impeccable, and Vicki R. Davis's sitting-room set looks like the kind of thing you'd see on Broadway if Broadway still did plays like this."

We're proud to be producing the kinds of plays you used to be able to see on Broadway. We couldn't do it without your support. Thank you!

 

Donate Online

Crème de Mint $10,000 and above
SilverMint $5,000-$9,999
ChocolateMint $2,500-$4,999
SpearMint $1,500- $2,499

PEPPERMINT $750-$1,499

DoubleMint $250-$749

Benefits

Crème de Mint $10,000 and above

  • Lunch for two with the Artistic Director
  • Invitation to a rehearsal
  • Plus all of the benefits listed below

SilverMint $5,000-$9,999

  • Invitation for two to every opening night and cast party
  • A script from one Mint production autographed by the cast
  • Plus all of the benefits listed below

ChocolateMint $2,500-$4,999

  • Invitation for two to one opening night and cast party
  • A poster from one of the year's productions
  • Plus all of the benefits listed below

SPEARMINT $1,500-$2,499

  • Two free tickets to each of the year's productions
  • A backstage tour with Artistic Director, Jonathan Bank
  • Plus all of the benefits listed below

PEPPERMINT $750-$1,499

  • First Priority Club discount (limit 4 per production)
  • Two complimentary tickets to each Further Reading Event
  • Plus all of the benefits listed below

DoubleMint $250-$749

  • Advance notice of all Mint productions
  • First Priority Club discount on tickets (limit 2 per production)
  • No service fee on ticket orders
  • Personal service from the Mint Box Office
  • Acknowledgement in every Mint program

2015 benefit invitation

If you would like to receive an invitation, click here.

To browse the invitation, click here.

If you would like to order tickets, click here.

 

 

The German poet, Schlegel, once wrote that "Literature is the immortality of speech." But he was wrong. We tend to think that because works of literature - novels, poems, and especially plays - tell us things about what it is to be human that, if not eternal, are certainly valid for a very long time, it follows that those works themselves have something like immortality. In fact, nothing could be further from the truth. Books fall out of print and out of favour, languishing dusty corners of libraries, their authors forgotten, their pages unread. In the case of plays, which only live fully on the stage, the claim to anything resembling immortality is even more precarious; plays require the whole physical and human paraphernalia of stages, theatres, actors, designers, directors and - most crucially - audiences, all of which can slip away sometimes in the currents of changing tastes.

It is thus no small thing to bring a play (or a playwright) back from obscurity-even once. To have accomplished this Lazarus trick consistently, over and over again, for two decades, as Jonathan Bank has done, is a remarkable accomplishment. I first met with Jonathan in 2009,when he was staging Is Life Worth Living? by the Irish writer Lennox Robinson.

However, Jonathan's most lasting legacy-at least from an Irish perspective - has been the restoration of the reputation of the Irish playwright Teresa Deevy. Deevy was one of Ireland's most original and acclaimed writers in the 1930s, but her work had disappeared; when Jonathan staged Wife to James Whelan in 2010, the play had last been performed in a small basement theatre in Dublin in the 1950s. He not only followed this up with acclaimed productions of Temporal Powers (2011) and Katie Roche (2013); he has directed rehearsed readings of shorter plays, co-edited a scholarly edition of her plays, and was instrumental in establishing a major archive of Deevy's manuscripts in Maynooth University, in Ireland. Today, a steady stream of research students in Ireland and in the U.S. are writing about her work, the archive is being digitised, and other theatres are beginning to follow where the Mint led by staging her work. Deevy's restored place in the canon of lrish theatre today can be traced directly back to Jonathan's vision. And if that is not a claim to immortality, it's the next best thing.

CHRISTOPHER MORASH, Seamus Heaney Professor of Irish Writing, Trinity College, Dublin